Direct Divide

Bridges

Written by: BW on 27/04/2014 20:52:08

Sometimes when you get to select albums for review something just stands out and you just know that it must be yours, much like an idol for Indiana Jones at the end of a trap filled cave. “Direct Divide” and their new album just so happens to be one of them.

“Break the Cycle” starts off innocently enough with a slow and haunting piano, but then sprawls out into this rocky guitar filled starting block for the album to build on. The violin sounds stir nicely in the background to make it stand out from the norm and it all sounds good.

“Down” is another song that starts off with an isolated instrument, albeit a lone electric guitar, which is then accompanied by all but the classical stuff. It is a spritely little tune and sounds pleasing enough. Harmonies also come in about halfway, as do the strings briefly. This song does bring a happy feel to you and it is a good tune, with a rather nicely subdued ending.

As we go through the album the quality of songs stays pretty high. The main rock heart is always on show and the additional things are just subtle enough to be noticed without being overpowering. It’s almost as if the violin is salt and the piano acts as pepper, seasoning the musical plate of food to everyone’s liking. “Liar” would be a generic rock song if it didn’t blend those two in the middle with a section all of their own before helping the rest of the band to carry it home.

This continues throughout and I have to say that this mixture really makes me smile. It is nice to see people mixing things up a bit and they do sound more interesting than others out there. With “Meteors” things change again, throwing together a slow paced track and some electrical keyboard work by the sound of things. If I had to be critical I would say the male backing vocal work is a little flat and doesn’t add to the song as much as it takes away, but it is a soothing interval to the way the rest of the album has been.

“Persephone” almost has a Muse styled opening and would be something you would expect from them, but it works so well and after about 10 seconds it sprawls into this fast paced little song. This time the classical strings are more prominent and it works very well, particularly in the chorus. This track also has a nice final third to watch out for. I don’t know if I’m being cynical, but I’m almost waiting for something to go wrong on this album.

The great thing is it doesn’t. There is a really high quality about everything. “Bridges” is a breath of fresh air in a stifling world of predictability. The songs work very well and the mixture of tracks and instruments all work with each other in such a great way. There are only two things I can find wrong with it. First one is that “Writing on the Wall” is quite a weak track on the album and it shows more than most because of the good work done on the rest of it. The second though is a strange one.

Now, I don’t know who is responsible for it, but the vocal track doesn’t seem to sound like it has been mixed right with the rest of the album. For most of the songs it almost sounds like the lead voice was added after the event and it just sounds a little off. I’m taking nothing away from the performance, but it just doesn’t sit right. Just for good measure, near the end of “Persephone” there is so much musically going on you can’t hear the words well at all. To me, this should be looked at and sorted, as I feel it doesn’t do the album the justice it deserves.

“Direct Divide” though are certainly united in producing a quality piece of work. “Bridges” is a great little album and sounds lovely. I certainly hope that over the years this turns into something really special and I am just thankful that they’ve stood their ground and done something that doesn’t follow the norm. Well done.

9

Download: Persephone, Running, Down,
For The Fans Of: 30 Seconds to Mars, Evanescence, Muse, Halestorm
Listen: facebook.com

Release date 01.04.2014
Self Released


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